Allozyme diversity and gene flow in Ophiostoma clavigerum (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae), the mycangial fungus of the Jeffrey pine beetle, Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

Diana L. Six, T. D. Paine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Genetic variation within and among 10 California populations of Ophiostoma clavigerum (Robinson-Jeffrey & Davidson) Harrington associated with the mycangia of Dendroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins was assessed using allozymes. Gene diversity was uniformly low across all populations, averaging 1.4%. Only 2 of 19 gene loci assayed were polymorphic. The three most southerly populations (two from the San Bernardino Mountains in southern California and one from the southern tip of the Sierra Nevada Mountains) were the most differentiated; however, all populations exhibited very low genetic distance. Several factors alone, or in combination could be responsible for the low genetic diversity observed in these populations including (i) a rarity of sexual recombination, (ii) a history involving genetic bottlenecks, and (iii) selection for a mutualistic association with the host beetle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)324-331
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Forest Research
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1999

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