Application of spaceborne scatterometer for mapping freeze-thaw state in northern landscapes as a measure of ecological and hydrological processes

Kyle McDonald, John Kimball, Reiner Zimmermann, Jo Bea Way, Steve Frolking, Steve Running

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Using the NASA scatterometer (NSCAT), the temporal change in the radar backscatter signature across Alaska was monitored to assess the scatterometer's capability for monitoring freeze/thaw transitions in northern ecotones. NSCAT flew from September 1996 through June 1997, providing approximately 9 months of high-quality data. Data from the ground stations was used to quantify the backscatter sensitivity to landscape freeze/thaw state under a variety of terrain and landcover conditions. Overall, the results confirm the potential of the scatterometer for measuring the timing of surface freeze-thaw transitions and associated shifts in hydrologic activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages2121-2123
Number of pages3
StatePublished - 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS'99) 'Remote Sensing of the Systems Earth - A Challenge for the 21st Century' - Hamburg, Ger
Duration: Jun 28 1999Jul 2 1999

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 1999 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS'99) 'Remote Sensing of the Systems Earth - A Challenge for the 21st Century'
CityHamburg, Ger
Period06/28/9907/2/99

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