Attracting students to the IS major: The role of it sophistication in introductory IS courses

Asli Yagmur Akbulut, Clayton Arlen Looney

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The Information Systems (IS) discipline is facing an enrollment crisis. Despite the steady decline in IS enrollments, the demand for information technology (IT) professionals continues to increase. Using a survey of 151 students enrolled in introductory IS courses at two universities, this study investigates the role that the level of technological sophistication plays in attracting students to the IS discipline. Grounded in Social Cognitive Theory, the study finds that the degree to which students perceive the IT taught in introductory IS courses as sophisticated affects student aspiration to pursue an IS degree. Specifically, IT sophistication enhances students' confidence in their ability to successfully perform as an IS major (i.e., self-efficacy) and elevates students' expectations that valued rewards will be received by majoring in IS (i.e., outcome expectations). In turn, strong self-efficacy and outcome expectations foster student interest in the IS discipline. Interest serves as the primary mechanism through which goals to choose the IS major emerge.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAssociation for Information Systems - 13th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2007
Subtitle of host publicationReaching New Heights
Pages1908-1917
Number of pages10
StatePublished - 2007
Event13th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2007 - Keystone, CO, United States
Duration: Aug 10 2007Aug 12 2007

Publication series

NameAssociation for Information Systems - 13th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2007: Reaching New Heights
Volume3

Conference

Conference13th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2007
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityKeystone, CO
Period08/10/0708/12/07

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Enrollment
  • Information systems education
  • Recruitment
  • Social cognitive career theory

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Attracting students to the IS major: The role of it sophistication in introductory IS courses'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this