Behavioral effects of fluoxetine on aggression and associative learning in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens)

Benjamin R. Eisenreich, Allen Szalda-Petree

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Past research has implicated serotonin as an important neurotransmitter in the facilitation of aggressive behavior. In Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), the SSRI fluoxetine has been demonstrated to reduce both frequency and duration of aggressive displays across a variety of concentration exposure procedures. While this multi-method approach has provided strong evidence for fluoxetine's impact on aggression, no study has sought to examine the behavioral mechanism by which fluoxetine exerts its anti-aggressive effect. To address this question, a Go-No Go discrimination task utilizing mirror presentations as a reinforcer was designed. Consistent with previous reports, the results indicated that fluoxetine may exert a sedative effect upon aggressive behavior via decreased arousal to external stimuli.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)37-42
    Number of pages6
    JournalBehavioural Processes
    Volume121
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

    Keywords

    • Aggression
    • Fluoxetine
    • Learning
    • Motivation
    • Serotonin

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