Compensatory saccades differ between those with vestibular hypofunction and multiple sclerosis pointing to unique roles for peripheral and central vestibular inputs

Andrew R. Wagner, Colin R. Grove, Brian J. Loyd, Leland E. Dibble, Michael C. Schubert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Individuals with peripheral or central vestibular dysfunction recruit compensatory saccades (CSs) in response to high acceleration, yaw head impulses. Although CSs have been shown to be an effective strategy for reducing gaze position error (GPE) in individuals with peripheral hypofunction, for individuals with central vestibular dysfunction, the effectiveness of CS is unknown. The purpose of our study was to compare the effectiveness of CS, defined as the ability to compensate for head velocity and eye position errors, between persons with central and peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We compared oculomotor responses during video head impulse testing between individuals with unilateral peripheral vestibular deafferentation, a disorder of the peripheral vestibular afferents, and individuals with multiple sclerosis, a condition affecting the central vestibular pathways. We hypothesized that relative to individuals with peripheral lesions, individuals with central dysfunction would recruit CSs that were delayed and inappropriately scaled to head velocity and GPE. We show that CSs recruited by persons with central vestibular pathology were not uniformly deficient but instead were of a sufficient velocity to compensate for reductions in VOR gain. Compared to those with peripheral vestibular lesions, individuals with central pathology also recruited earlier covert CS with amplitudes that were better corrected for GPE. Conversely, those with central lesions showed greater variability in the amplitude of overt CS relative to GPE. These data point to a unique role for peripheral and central vestibular inputs in the recruitment of CS and suggest that covert CSs are an effective oculomotor strategy for individuals with multiple sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)934-945
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume128
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • compensatory saccade
  • multiple sclerosis
  • vHIT
  • vestibular hypofunction
  • vestibulo-ocular reflex

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