Cultural identification and smoking among American Indian adults in an urban setting

Sarah Angstman, Kari Jo Harris, Amanda Golbeck, Gyda Swaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. Among American Indians (AIs), an important relationship has been theorized between cultural identification and substance abuse, including smoking. We investigated the relationship between cultural identification and smoking among AI adults. Design. Using the Orthogonal Cultural Identification Scale (OCIS), we examined the relationship between AI and White cultural identification and cigarette use in a sample of AI recruited at an urban Indian center (n=217). Results. We found that high AIs identification predicted smoker status and high White identification predicted non-smoker status when controlling for age and reservation residence. Orthogonal cultural identification status (categorized as high White/high AI, high White/low AI, low White/high AI, or low White/low AI) did not predict smoker status when controlling for age and reservation residence. OCIS item analysis revealed that positive responses to the individual OCIS items 'My family lives by the American Indian way of life,' 'I live by the American Indian way of life,' and 'I am a success in the American Indian way of life' predicted smoker status when controlling for age and reservation residence. Conclusions. Our data suggest that, among some groups of urban AIs, recreational smoking is associated with AI cultural identification.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-302
Number of pages14
JournalEthnicity and Health
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • American Indians
  • Cultural identification
  • Smoking

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cultural identification and smoking among American Indian adults in an urban setting'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this