Different selective pressures lead to different genomic outcomes as newly-formed hybrid yeasts evolve

Jeff S. Piotrowski, Saisubramanian Nagarajan, Evgueny Kroll, Alison Stanbery, Kami E. Chiotti, Arthur L. Kruckeberg, Barbara Dunn, Gavin Sherlock, Frank Rosenzweig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Interspecific hybridization occurs in every eukaryotic kingdom. While hybrid progeny are frequently at a selective disadvantage, in some instances their increased genome size and complexity may result in greater stress resistance than their ancestors, which can be adaptively advantageous at the edges of their ancestors' ranges. While this phenomenon has been repeatedly documented in the field, the response of hybrid populations to long-term selection has not often been explored in the lab. To fill this knowledge gap we crossed the two most distantly related members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum, and established a mixed population of homoploid and aneuploid hybrids to study how different types of selection impact hybrid genome structure.

Original languageEnglish
Article number46
JournalBMC Evolutionary Biology
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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