Effects of household and participant characteristics on personal exposure and kitchen concentration of fine particulate matter and black carbon in rural Honduras

Rebecca Witinok-Huber, Maggie L. Clark, John Volckens, Bonnie N. Young, Megan L. Benka-Coker, Ethan Walker, Jennifer L. Peel, Casey Quinn, Joshua P. Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Traditional cooking with solid fuels (biomass, animal dung, charcoals, coal) creates household air pollution that leads to millions of premature deaths and disability worldwide each year. Exposure to household air pollution is highest in low- and middle-income countries. Using data from a stepped-wedge randomized controlled trial of a cookstove intervention among 230 households in Honduras, we analyzed the impact of household and personal variables on repeated 24-h measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) exposure. Six measurements were collected approximately six-months apart over the course of the three-year study. Multivariable mixed models explained 37% of variation in personal PM2.5 exposure and 49% of variation in kitchen PM2.5 concentrations. Additionally, multivariable models explained 37% and 47% of variation in personal and kitchen BC concentrations, respectively. Stove type, season, presence of electricity, primary stove location, kitchen enclosure type, stove use time, and presence of kerosene for lighting were all associated with differences in geometric mean exposures. Stove type explained the most variability of the included variables. In future studies of household air pollution, tracking the cooking behaviors and daily activities of participants, including outdoor exposures, may explain exposure variation beyond the household and personal variables considered here.

Original languageEnglish
Article number113869
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume214
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Biomass burning
  • Cookstoves
  • Household air pollution
  • PM
  • Repeated measures

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