Effects of soy or milk protein during a high-fat feeding challenge on oxidative stress, inflammation, and lipids in healthy men

Christina G. Campbell, Blakely D. Brown, Danielle Dufner, William G. Thorland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Soy isoflavones may impede atherogenic processes associated with cardiovascular disease. Research suggests that the postprandial generation of TG-rich remnants contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. The purpose of the current study was to determine if 39 g soy (85 mg aglycone isoflavones, treatment) compared with 40 g milk protein (0 mg aglycone isoflavones, control) in combination with a high-fat meal can modify postprandial, atherogenic-associated events and biomarkers for oxidative stress, inflammation, and thrombosis. Fifteen healthy men (20-47 yr) participated in a double-blind cross-over meal-challenge study occurring on two nonconsecutive days. The study meals consisted of two high-fat apple muffins consumed with either a soy or milk shake (229 ml, 41% fat, 41% carbohydrate, and 18% protein). Blood samples were obtained at baseline (fasted) and hours two, four, and six postprandial. Plasma TG significantly increased in both treatment and control meal challenges compared with baseline. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) between treatment (soy) and control (milk) for ex vivo copper-induced LDL oxidation, serum C-reactive protein, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), serum fibrinogen, or plasma lipids (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, TG). IL-6-concentrations significantly decreased as a function of time during either meal challenge (P = 0.005). These data suggest that consumption of soy or milk protein in conjunction with a high-fat meal does not acutely modify postprandial oxidative stress, inflammation, or plasma lipid concentrations in young, healthy men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-265
Number of pages9
JournalLipids
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

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