Evaluating the effectiveness of a commercial portable air purifier in homes with wood burning stoves: A preliminary study

Julie F. Hart, Tony J. Ward, Terry M. Spear, Richard J. Rossi, Nicholas N. Holland, Brodie G. Loushin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Wood burning for residential heating is prevalent in the Rocky Mountain regions of the United States. Studies have shown that wood stoves can be a significant source of PM2.5 within homes. In this study, the effectiveness of an electrostatic filter portable air purifier was evaluated (1) in a home where a wood stove was the sole heat source and (2) in a home where a wood stove was used as a supplemental heat source. Particle count concentrations in six particle sizes and particle mass concentrations in two particle sizes were measured for ten 12-hour purifier on and ten purifier off trials in each home. Particle count concentrations were reduced by 61-85 percent. Similar reductions were observed in particle mass concentrations. These findings, although limited to one season, suggest that a portable air purifier may effectively reduce indoor particulate matter concentrations associated with wood combustion during home heating.

Original languageEnglish
Article number324809
JournalJournal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume2011
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluating the effectiveness of a commercial portable air purifier in homes with wood burning stoves: A preliminary study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this