Evaluation of management factors affecting the relative success of a brook trout eradication program using yy male fish and electrofishing suppression

Casey C. Day, Erin L. Landguth, Ryan K. Simmons, William P. Baker, Andrew R. Whiteley, Paul M. Lukacs, Kaeli A. Davenport, Andrew R. Bearlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Removal of non-native fish populations can be crucial to the conservation of native species, but often presents a complex challenge for managers. The goal of Trojan Y chromosome (TYC) programs is to skew the non-native sex ratio until only males remain, leading to eradication. We present results from a simulation model used to explore effects of alternative management approaches on an in-progress mechanical removal and TYC program to eradicate non-native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Simulation results indicated that stocking fingerling YY males (~137 mm) was more effective than stocking catchable-sized YY males (~230 mm), although questions about intercohort competition warrant further investigation. Increasing the proportion of mature fingerling YY males reduced treatment time by increasing the number of YY male spawners and increasing density-dependent mortality on young, mature wild brook trout. Maximizing the spatial distribution of YY male releases may be crucial to program success but is also dependent upon immediate dispersal movements. Principles derived from our results can be broadly applied to the management of other aquatic invaded systems using TYC programs to eradicate non-native species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1109-1119
Number of pages11
JournalCanadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Volume78
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Funding

Funding and support for this study was provided by Seattle City Light. Data for this work was contributed by Seattle City Light, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, West Fork Environmental, and the Kalispel Tribe of Indians. Harry Rich, Al Solonsky, and Zachary Holden provided helpful contributions to model development, analysis, and publication. Computational resources and support from Allen Warren, the University of Montana’s Computational Ecology Lab, and the Griz Shared Computing Cluster contributed to this research. and support for this study was provided by Seattle City Light. Data for this work was contributed by Seattle City Light, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, West Fork Environmental, and the Kalispel Tribe of Indians. Harry Rich, Al Solonsky, and Zachary Holden provided helpful contributions to model development, analysis, and publication. Computational resources and support from Allen Warren, the University of Montana?s Computational Ecology Lab, and the Griz Shared Computing Cluster contributed to this research.

FundersFunder number
Seattle City Light
Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife

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