Exposure to air pollution is associated with lung hyperinflation in healthy children and adolescents in southwest mexico city: A pilot study

L. Calderon-Garciduenas, A. Mora-Tiscareno, C. J. Chung, G. Valencia, L. A. Fordham, R. Garcia, N. Osnaya, L. Romero, H. Acuna, A. Villarreal-Calderon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Air pollution produces adverse health effects. The consequences of lifelong daily exposures to atmospheric pollutants upon the respiratory apparatus of healthy children are of considerable clinical importance. We investigated the association between exposure to a highly polluted urban environment with a complex mixture of air pollutants - ozone and particulate matter the predominant ones - and chest x-ray abnormalities in 59 healthy Mexican children who are lifelong residents of Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), with a negative history of tobacco exposure and respiratory illnesses. Their clinical results and x-ray findings were compared to those of 19 Mexican control children, residents of a low-pollution area, with a similar negative history of tobacco exposure and respiratory illnesses. Ozone concentrations in SWMMC exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O3:0.08 ppm as 1-h maximal concentration, not to be exceeded more than 4 times a year, on 71% of days in 1986 and 95% in 1997, with values as high as 0.48 ppm. Ozone maximal peaks are usually recorded between 2 and 5 pm Coinciding with children's outdoor physical activities. Children in the control group reported no upper or lower respiratory symptomatology. Every SWMMC child complained of upper and/or lower respiratory symptoms, including epistaxis, nasal dryness and crusting, cough, shortness of breath, and chest discomfort. Children aged 7-13 yr had the most symptomatology, while 5- to 6-year olds and adolescents with the lowest number of statistically significant outdoor exposure hours had less respiratory symptoms. Bilateral symmetric mild lung hyperinflation was significantly associated with exposure to the SWMMC atmosphere (p = .0004). Chronic and sustained inhalation of a complex mixture of air pollutants, including ozone and particulate matter (PM), is associated with lung hyperinflation, suggestive of small airway disease, in a population of clinically healthy children and adolescents. Small airways are a target of air pollutants in SWMMC children, with ozone and PM being most likely responsible, based on experimental animal, controlled-chamber, and epidemiological data available. Our main concern is the potential likelihood for the development of chronic lung disease in this highly exposed population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)537-561
Number of pages25
JournalInhalation Toxicology
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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