Longitudinal study of knee load avoidant movement behavior after total knee arthroplasty with recommendations for future retraining interventions

Jesse C. Christensen, Christopher E. Pelt, K. Bo Foreman, Paul C. LaStayo, Andrew E. Anderson, Jeremy M. Gililland, Ryan L. Mizner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to evaluate clinical and biomechanical changes in self-report survey, quadriceps strength and gait analysis over 3- and 6-months post-total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and confirm the immediate effects of two forms of kinetic biofeedback on improving inter-limb biomechanics during a physically demanding decline walking task. Methods: Thirty patients with unilateral TKA underwent testing at 3- and 6-months following surgery. All underwent self-report survey, quadriceps strength and gait analysis testing. Patients were assigned to one of two types of biofeedback [vertical ground reaction force (vGRF), knee extensor moment (KEM)]. Results: No decrease in gait asymmetry was observed in non-biofeedback trials over time (p > 0.05), despite significant improvements in self-report physical function (p < 0.01, Cohen d = 0.44), pain interference (p = 0.01, Cohen d = 0.68), numeric knee pain (p = 0.01, Cohen d = 0.74) and quadriceps strength (p = 0.01, Cohen d = 0.49) outcomes. KEM biofeedback induced significant decrease in total support moment (p = 0.05, Cohen f2 = 0.14) and knee extensor moment (p = 0.05, Cohen f2 = 0.21) asymmetry compared to using vGRF biofeedback at 6-months. vGRF biofeedback demonstrated significant decrease in hip flexion kinematic asymmetry compared to KEM biofeedback (p = 0.05, Cohen f2 = 0.18) at 6-months. Conclusion: Gait compensation remained similar from 3- to 6-months during a task requiring greater knee demand compared to overground walking post-TKA, despite improvements in self-report survey and quadriceps strength. Single session gait symmetry training at 6-month supports findings at 3-month testing that motor learning is possible. KEM biofeedback is more effective at immediately improving joint kinetic loading compared to vGRF biofeedback post-TKA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-99
Number of pages10
JournalKnee
Volume30
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Biofeedback
  • Clinical, biomechanics
  • Gait analysis
  • Total knee arthroplasty

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