Metabolic evidence rather than amounts of red or processed meat as a risk on Korean colorectal cancer

Eunbee Kim, Joon Seok Lee, Eunjae Kim, Myung Ah Lee, Alfred N. Fonteh, Michael Kwong, Yoon Hee Cho, Un Jae Lee, Mihi Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has increased in Korea, a newly-industrialized Asian country, with the dramatic increase of meat intake. To assess the risks of red or processed meat consumption on CRC, we performed a case-control study with biological monitoring of urinary1-OHP, PhIP, and MeIQx for the meat exposure; dG-C8 MeIQx and dG-C8 PhIP for HCA-induced DNA adducts; and homocysteine and CRP in blood as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 31fatty acids in urine for inflammation and lipid alteration. We further analyzed global DNA methylation and expression of 15 CRC-related genes. As a result, the consumption of red or processed meat was not higher in the cases than in the controls. However, urinary MeIQx and PhIP were associated with the intake of red meat and urinary 1-OHP. MDA and multiple fatty acids were related to the exposure biomarkers. Most of the 31 fatty acids and multiple saturated fatty acids were higher in the cases than in the controls. Finally, the cases showed upregulation of PTGS2, which is related to pro-inflammatory fatty acids. This study describes indirect mechanisms of CRC via lipid alteration with a series of processes including exposure to red meat, alteration of fatty acids, and relevant gene expression.

Original languageEnglish
Article number462
JournalMetabolites
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Heterocyclic amines
  • Lipid
  • Processed meat
  • Red meat

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Metabolic evidence rather than amounts of red or processed meat as a risk on Korean colorectal cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this