Mood management intervention for college smokers with elevated depressive symptoms: A pilot study

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Abstract

Objective: This pilot study examined smoking reduction and cessation among college smokers with elevated depressive symptomatology participating in a group-based behavioral counseling, mood management, and motivational enhancement combined intervention (CBT). Participants and Methods: Fifty-eight smokers (smoked 6 days in the past 30) were randomized to 6 sessions of CBT (n = 29) or a nutrition-focused attention-matched control group (CG; n = 29). Results: Relative to CG participants, significantly more CBT participants reduced smoking intensity by 50% (χ 2[1, N = 58] = 4.86, p =.028) at end of treatment. Although CBT participants maintained smoking reductions at 3- and 6-month follow-up, group differences were no longer significant. No group differences in cessation emerged. Finally, participants in both groups evidenced increased motivation to reduce smoking at end of treatment (F[1, 44] = 11.717, p =.001, η p 2 =.207). Conclusions: Findings demonstrate the utility of this intervention for smoking reduction and maintenance of reductions over time among a population of college students with elevated depressive symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-45
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Keywords

  • cigarette smoking
  • college students
  • depressive symptoms

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