Parent–Child Conflict, Acculturation Gap, Acculturative Stress, and Behavior Problems in Arab American Adolescents

Anisa N. Goforth, Andy V. Pham, Evelyn R. Oka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study examined how acculturation gap, acculturative stress, parent–child conflict, and behavior problems are related in a sample of Arab American adolescents. Seventy-six parent–child dyads completed questionnaires assessing acculturation, parent–child conflict, and behavior problems. Parents and adolescents reported similar levels of acculturation on American mainstream orientation as well as on Arab heritage orientation. Regression analyses showed that the acculturation gap between parents and children in heritage cultural orientation significantly predicted adolescent behavior problems. Mediation analyses revealed that adolescent-reported parent–child conflict partially mediated the relation between acculturative stress and behavior problems. Parent-reported parent–child conflict partially mediated the relation between the acculturation gap and behavior problems. Current findings highlight the importance of examining adolescents’ and parents’ acculturation as well as the underpinnings of parent–child conflict in Arab American families.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)821-836
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 12 2015

Keywords

  • acculturation
  • acculturation gap
  • Arab American
  • behavior problems

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