Particulate matter immunomodulatory effects on autoantibody development in New Zealand mixed mice

Mary Hassani, Jared M. Brown, Maria T. Morandi, Andrij Holian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Particulate matter exposures have been linked to increased mortality and morbidity that may be associated with immune dysfunction. Therefore, Lupus-prone New Zealand mixed mice (NZM) were intranasally instilled with either 30 μ? l saline or 30 μ? l saline suspensions of 500 μ? g acid-washed PM 1648, PM 1648 or PM2.5 collected in Houston, TX, once a week for 4 weeks. Lung injury, mortality, and various immune dysfuntions were assessed. Accelerated mortality was observed in the PM 1648 and PM2.5 instilled mice compared to the acid-washed PM 1648 and saline-instilled mice. PM 1648 and PM2.5 significantly suppressed the natural development of anti-nuclear antibodies in NZM mice at 16 weeks. IgG serum levels were significantly increased in the acid-washed PM 1648 instilled mice at 8 weeks following PM instillation compared to the saline-instilled group. In contrast, IgG serum levels were significantly decreased in the PM 1648 and PM2.5 instilled mice at 8 weeks post-PM instillation as compared to the acid-washed PM 1648 instilled group. There were increases in the amount of immune cell infiltration, fibrosis and collagen deposition within the lungs of PM 1648 and PM2.5 groups in comparison within the saline- and acid-washed PM 1648 instilled mice. These results demonstrate that PM has an immunosuppressive effect on the development of anti-nuclear autoantibodies and modulates the IgG responses in this model of autoimmune disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-102
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immunotoxicology
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

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