Preoperative quadriceps weakness preferentially predicts postoperative aberrant movement patterns during high-demand mobility following total knee arthroplasty

Jesse C. Christensen, Ryan L. Mizner, K. Bo Foreman, Paul C. LaStayo, Christopher L. Peters, Christopher E. Pelt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Nearly all patients with total knee arthroplasty show aberrant movement patterns during tasks requiring greater joint demand compared to matched peers. Greater movement compensation leads to increased loading onto other joints, decreased functional capacity and limited reserve for independence later in life. Understanding how preoperative predictors contribute to postoperative aberrant movement patterns is needed to make better decisions for patients considering total knee arthroplasty. Methods: Forty-seven patients were tested preoperatively and six months following primary total knee arthroplasty. Demographic (age, sex, body mass), self-reported (knee pain, perception of physical performance, physical activity level), physical performance (quadriceps strength, lower limb power and timed stair climbing) and surgical metrics were collected as predictor variables. Three-dimensional models based on joint mechanic asymmetry during a decline walking task were collected at six months postoperatively. Decline walking is a preferred means to assess the surgical knee's contribution to limb performance during high-demand tasks. Bootstrap inclusion fraction was employed to compare the stability of each predictor variable prior to the final regression model. Results: Preoperative quadriceps strength (β = 0.33; p = 0.04) showed a significant relationship with knee extensor angular impulse during loading phase. No other predictor variable had any meaningful relationship with aberrant movement patterns (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings highlight patients’ preoperative quadriceps strength as a meaningful predictor of postoperative performance. Preoperative quadriceps strength should be addressed when considering the knee's ability to contribute to higher demanding mobility tasks following surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-87
Number of pages9
JournalKnee
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Decline walking
  • Gait analysis
  • Quadriceps strength
  • Total knee arthroplasty

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