Rapid response tools and datasets for post-fire modeling: Linking Earth Observations and process-based hydrological models to support post-fire remediation

M. E. Miller, M. Billmire, W. J. Elliot, K. A. Endsley, P. R. Robichaud

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Preparation is key to utilizing Earth Observations and process-based models to support post-wildfire mitigation. Post-fire flooding and erosion can pose a serious threat to life, property and municipal water supplies. Increased runoff and sediment delivery due to the loss of surface cover and fire-induced changes in soil properties are of great concern. Remediation plans and treatments must be developed and implemented before the first major storms in order to be effective. One of the primary sources of information for making remediation decisions is a soil burn severity map derived from Earth Observation data (typically Landsat) that reflects fire induced changes in vegetation and soil properties. Slope, soils, land cover and climate are also important parameters that need to be considered. Spatially-explicit process-based models can account for these parameters, but they are currently under-utilized relative to simpler, lumped models because they are difficult to set up and require spatially-explicit inputs (digital elevation models, soils, and land cover). Our goal is to make process-based models more accessible by preparing spatial inputs before a fire, so that datasets can be rapidly combined with soil burn severity maps and formatted for model use. We are building an online database (http://geodjango.mtri.org/geowepp/) for the continental United States that will allow users to upload soil burn severity maps. The soil burn severity map is combined with land cover and soil datasets to generate the spatial model inputs needed for hydrological modeling of burn scars. Datasets will be created to support hydrological models, post-fire debris flow models and a dry ravel model. Our overall vision for this project is that advanced GIS surface erosion and mass failure prediction tools will be readily available for post-fire analysis using spatial information from a single online site.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences - ISPRS Archives
EditorsG. Schreier, P. E. Skrovseth, H. Staudenrausch
Pages469-476
Number of pages8
Edition7W3
ISBN (Electronic)9780000000002, 9781629934297, 9781629935126, 9781629935201
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 28 2015
Event2015 36th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - Berlin, Germany
Duration: May 11 2015May 15 2015

Publication series

NameInternational Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences - ISPRS Archives
Number7W3
Volume40
ISSN (Print)1682-1750

Conference

Conference2015 36th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityBerlin
Period05/11/1505/15/15

Keywords

  • Databases
  • Forest fire
  • Forestry
  • Hazards
  • Hydrology
  • Land cover
  • Soil

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Rapid response tools and datasets for post-fire modeling: Linking Earth Observations and process-based hydrological models to support post-fire remediation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this