Reconciling resource extraction and species conservation in a multi-use landscape: Immediate and long-term impacts of logging on rainforest mammal diversity

Jennifer L. Wall, Brent Loken, Jedediah F. Brodie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tropical forest ecosystems are the most species-rich in the world and face intense pressures from land conversion. If done well, selective logging can be an important way of supporting local economies while minimally impacting wildlife. However, most studies on how selective logging affects wildlife come from sites that have been logged some time ago, often a decade or more. Here we assess how logging affects species assemblages in the very short term, immediately after the cessation of timber operations. We estimated overall mammal species richness in unlogged forest, previously logged forest, and an active logging concession in Indonesian Borneo using rarefaction-extrapolation-based diversity estimators. We found that estimated species richness did not differ significantly between unlogged forest (15.5 ± 2.82 species), previously logged forest (14.5 ± 2.10), or recently logged sites (14.2 ± 1.45) sites. Our findings suggest that the short-term impacts of properly managed selective logging are on par with the longer-term impacts that have been assessed in many prior studies.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere01642
JournalGlobal Ecology and Conservation
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Land sharing
  • Land sparing
  • Sustainable development
  • Timber harvest
  • Tropical rainforest

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