Relationship-building to develop an Indigenous community-based epidemiological study investigating developmental resilience factors among children with prenatal substance exposure

H. C. Russette, N. Graham, S. Swanson, E. O. Semmens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tribal Nations experience substance misuse at high rates often attributed to historical and contemporary traumas. In response, several Tribal Nations are addressing these issues through efforts to promote recovery and prevention to substance misuse. Study objectives were to partner with a Tribal Nation to develop a study to explore factors that contribute to the wellbeing of families to children with prenatal substance exposure and disseminate findings that can be translated back into the community. We applied Community-based participatory research (CBPR), strengths-based, and community-driven approaches during this two-year study development phase. We experienced challenges and identified solutions to partnering with one Tribal Nation on an epidemiological mixed-methods study centered on families with children that have prenatal substance exposure. Key inputs were becoming familiarizing with the community setting, structural supports for CBPR research, incorporating Indigenous CBPR principles, and developing a Community Advisory Team. We successfully collaborated with the Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes Early Childhood Services program to develop a robust study design and a dissemination plan to ensure translation of study findings to the community. The robust study design consisted of common themes specific to a highly stigmatized study population, substance-abusing pregnant women, to protect participant confidentiality. Research alignment with community goals, allotting meaningful time to develop a research partnership, and incorporating culturally sensitive and community-relevant measures contributed to the successful development of an effective and rigorous study to better serve the Tribal Nation on addressing substance misuse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-605
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

Keywords

  • CBPR
  • Community-driven approach
  • Native Americans
  • prenatal substance exposure
  • strengths-based approach

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