Relative control of air temperature and water status on seasonal transpiration of Pinus contorta.

J. S. Graham, S. W. Running

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Leaf conductance was measured periodically from early spring until October for lodgepole pine saplings in Montana on a harsh site exhibiting low temperatures, high absolute humidity deficits, and substantial soil moisture depletion. Springtime maximum daily leaf conductance was correlated with previous night minimum air temperature and a seasonal temperature summation. Summer leaf conductance was correlated with predawn leaf water potential and absolute humidity deficit. To assess the significance of these leaf conductance controls to the seasonal water balance of a forest stand on this site, regression equations relating leaf conductance to environmental parameters were incorporated into a stand hydrologic model. Removing spring air temperature controls of leaf conductance increased transpiration in May and June by 47%, but overall seasonal transpiration was increased by only 8%. Summer humidity and predawn water potential controls were necessary to prevent lethal water stress. -Authors

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)833-838
Number of pages6
JournalCanadian Journal of Forest Research
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

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