School psychology research and practice in East Asia: Perspectives on the past, present, and future directions of the field

Jacqueline A. Brown, Yayoi Watanabe, Dong Hun Lee, Kent McIntosh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To engage in a comparison of school psychology research and practice in eastern and western countries, the current study sought to identify key themes that have influenced the field of school psychology in East Asian countries. Forty-six leading school psychology professionals in Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Thailand, and Taiwan provided their perspectives to a six-question survey based on a survey created by McIntosh, Martinez, Ty, and McClain (2013) regarding pivotal ideas and findings related to research and practice in the past 25 years, present, and future that they find particularly exciting. Qualitative thematic analysis, using NVivo software, yielded nine major and 41 minor categories. Across the three time periods (past, present, future), six of the nine major categories (Data-Informed Practices and Their Implementation, Knowledge and Practice of Individual Differences, Theory Development, Technology Development, Development of School Psychology, and Consultation and Collaboration) and seven of the 41 minor categories were present. A comparison between the current study and the McIntosh and colleagues (2013) study suggests that there were many consistencies in major and minor categories. Comparisons between these two studies, along with limitations, future areas for research, and implications for practice, are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557-582
Number of pages26
JournalSchool Psychology International
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • East Asia
  • Hong Kong
  • international school psychology
  • Japan
  • practice
  • research
  • South Korea
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand

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