Small RNAs of Borrelia burgdorferi: Characterizing functional regulators in a sea of sRNAs

Meghan C. Lybecker, D. Scott Samuels

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Borrelia (Borreliella) burgdorferi and closely related genospecies are the causative agents of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease north of the equator. The bacterium, a member of the spirochete phylum, is acquired by a tick vector that feeds on an infected vertebrate host and is transmitted to another vertebrate during subsequent feeding by the next tick stage. The precise navigation of this enzootic cycle entails the regulation of genes required for these two host-specific phases as well as the transitions between them. Recently, an expansive swath of small RNAs has been identified in B. burgdorferi and likely many, if not most, are involved in regulating gene expression. Regardless, with only a few exceptions, the functions of these RNAs are completely unknown. However, several state-ofthe- art approaches are available to identify the targets of these RNAs and provide insight into their role in the enzootic cycle and infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)317-323
Number of pages7
JournalYale Journal of Biology and Medicine
Volume90
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Gene regulation
  • Lyme disease
  • Non-coding RNA
  • RNA-seq
  • SRNA
  • Spirochete
  • Transcriptome

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