Smoking and cerebral oxidative stress and air pollution: A dreadful equation with particulate matter involved and one more powerful reason not to smoke anything!

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Smoking has serious health effects. Cigarettes, including tobacco, marijuana, and electronic nicotine delivery systems are very effective ways to inhale harmful amounts of fine and ultrafine particulate matter. Does size matter? Yes, indeed! The smaller the particle you inhale, the higher the ability to produce reactive oxygen species and to readily access the brain. In this issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Durazzo provides evidence of an association between active cigarette tobacco smoking in cognitively-normal elders and increased cerebral oxidative stress, while in actively smoking Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, the association was also seen with smaller left and total hippocampal volumes. This paper has highly relevant results of interest across the US and the world because millions of people are active smokers and they have other genetic and environmental risk factors that could play a key role in the development/worsening of brain oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. Smoking basically anything producing aerosols with particulate matter in the fine and ultrafine size range is detrimental to your brain. Marijuana and e-cigarette use has grown steadily among adolescents and young adults. Smoking-related cerebral oxidative stress is a potential mechanism promoting AD pathology and increased risk for AD. Current knowledge also relates fine and ultrafine particles exposures influencing neurodevelopmental processes in utero. The results from Durazzo et al. should be put in a broader context, a context that includes evaluating the oxidative stress of nano-aerosols associated with cigarette emissions and their synergistic effects with air pollution exposures. AD is expected to increase in the US threefold by the year 2050, and some of these future AD patients are smoking and vaping right now. Understanding the impact of everyday exposures to long-term harmful consequences for brain health is imperative.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-112
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2016

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Mexico City
  • Nanoparticles
  • Oxidative stress
  • PM2.5
  • Smoking

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Smoking and cerebral oxidative stress and air pollution: A dreadful equation with particulate matter involved and one more powerful reason not to smoke anything!'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this