The effects of three jump landing tasks on kinetic and kinematic measures: Implications for ACL injury research

Anna Cruz, David Bell, Melanie McGrath, Troy Blackburn, Darin Padua, Daniel Herman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study compared the biomechanics of jump landing tasks used in ACL research. Twenty-seven female subjects performed a drop landing (DL), a drop landing with a vertical jump (DVJ), and a forward jump landing with a vertical jump (FVJ). We hypothesized that as one progressed from the drop landing through the forward-vertical jump that the kinematic and kinetic demands would increase, with progressively increasing knee and hip forces, moments, and angles on landing. Separate repeated-measures ANOVAs were performed. The FVJ had the highest peak anterior tibial shear force (p < 0.001), hip flexion angle (p < 0.001), knee flexion moment (p < 0.001), and knee valgus moment (p < 0.001). The DL had the smallest knee flexion angle (p = 0.001) and hip flexion angle (p < 0.001), while the DVJ had the lowest knee valgus moment (p < 0.001). These results indicate that seemingly minor variations between jump landing tasks may influence landing biomechanics. Caution should be used when comparing studies using different tasks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-342
Number of pages13
JournalResearch in Sports Medicine
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Keywords

  • ACL
  • ACL injury
  • biomechanics
  • injury prevention
  • kinematics
  • kinetics

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