The minimal clinically important difference for gait speed in significant unilateral vestibular hypofunction after vestibular rehabilitation

Isaac B. Thorman, Brian J. Loyd, Richard A. Clendaniel, Leland E. Dibble, Michael C. Schubert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gait speed is a valid measure of both physical function and vestibular health. Vestibular rehabilitation is useful to improve gait speed for patients with vestibular hypofunction, yet there is little data to indicate how changes in gait speed reflect changes in patient-reported health outcomes. We determined the minimal clinically important difference in the gait speed of patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction, mostly due to deafferentation surgery, as anchored to the Dizziness Handicap Index and the Activities Balance Confidence scale, validated using regression analysis, change difference, receiver-operator characteristic curve, and average change methods. After six weeks of vestibular rehabilitation, a change in gait speed from 0.20 to 0.34 m/s with 95% confidence was required for the patients to perceive a significant reduction in perception of dizziness and improved balance confidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-20
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Otology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2023

Keywords

  • Gait speed
  • Minimal clinically important difference
  • Vestibular hypofunction

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