“They Didn’t Ask.” Rural Women With Disabilities and Experiences of Violence Describe Interactions With the Healthcare System

Kimberly Aguillard, Rosemary Hughes, Gretchen L. Gemeinhardt, Vanessa Schick, Sheryl McCurdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Women with disabilities are at risk of experiencing multiple forms of severe and prolonged violence, yet guidelines for screening this population are unclear, screening rates are historically low, and screening tools may be inadequate to capture disability-related aspects of abuse. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 33 rural women in the United States with diverse disabilities and experiences of violence. They described overarching healthcare provider and system factors that influenced their trust and confidence in healthcare delivery as an avenue to support their safety. Women described interactions with the healthcare system during their experience of violence as a missed opportunity for identifying and responding to their abuse and connecting them with resources. We conclude with policy and practice recommendations based on women with disabilities’ perspectives and insights.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)656-669
Number of pages14
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • abuse
  • adaptation
  • caregivers
  • caretaking
  • communication
  • coping
  • cultural competence
  • culture
  • disability
  • disabled persons
  • doctor-patient
  • enduring
  • health care
  • minorities
  • nurse-patient
  • quality of care
  • remote
  • rural
  • survivorship

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