Traditional Ceremonial Practices as a Strategy to Reduce Problem Substance Use in American Indian Communities: A Systematic Review

Damian M. Chase-Begay, Jeffery Chaichana Peterson, Jessica Liddell, Annie Belcourt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This systematic review assessed the feasibility of American Indian traditional ceremonial practices (TCPs) to address problem substance use in both reservation and urban settings. Methods: Between September 24, 2021, and January 14, 2022, culturally specific review protocols were applied to articles retrieved from over 160 electronic databases-including PubMed, Global Health, Global Health Archive, CINAHL Complete, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Health and Wellness (Gale), Sage Online Journals, and ScienceDirect. Results: A total of 10 studies met the criteria for inclusion in the review. Studies were conducted with both urban (n = 7) and reservation (n = 3) American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations. The most common TCP activities reported were drumming (n = 9), sweat lodge (n = 7), and talking circles (n = 6). All 10 studies reported some type of quantitative data showing a reduction of substance use associated with TCP interventions or activities. Conclusions: The current status of the literature is emerging and does not allow for meta-Analysis of existing studies. However, the existing literature does indicate promise for the use of TCPs to address problem substance use in AIAN communities in a way that is effective and also culturally congruent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)408-419
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Integrative and Complementary Medicine
Volume29
Issue number6-7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2023

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • Native American
  • ceremony
  • substance use
  • systematic review
  • traditional practices

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