Trait meta-mood and affect as predictors of somatic symptoms and life satisfaction

Brian L. Thompson, Jennifer Waltz, Kristin Croyle, Alison C. Pepper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research on whether low emotional intelligence is related to somatic symptoms independent of affect has shown mixed findings (De Gucht, Fischler, & Heiser, 2004; Kooiman, 1998; Lundh & Simonsson-Sarnecki, 2001). This study examined what elements of emotional intelligence and affect predict somatic symptoms and life satisfaction. Undergraduate students (n = 488) completed the Trait Meta-Mood Scale, Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, and the General Life subscale of the Extended Satisfaction with Life Scale. Measures were regressed on somatic symptoms and life satisfaction. The first model found that negative affect was the best predictor of somatic symptoms, followed by awareness of mood and ability to discriminate among moods. The second model found that affect was the best predictor of life satisfaction, but that the ability to repair negative moods and maintain positive moods also predicted a small amount of the variance. No interaction effects were found. Results do not support previous research that emotional intelligence does not predict somatic symptoms when affect is held constant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1786-1795
Number of pages10
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume43
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Life satisfaction
  • Somatization
  • Trait meta-mood

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