Water quality and waterborne disease in the Niger River Inland Delta, Mali: A study of local knowledge and response

Sarah J. Halvorson, Ashley L. Williams, Sidy Ba, Florence V. Dunkel

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper presents the findings of a study to assess patterns in local knowledge of and response to water quality and waterborne diseases in relation to seasonal changes in the Niger River Inland Delta. The study draws on field data collected in four villages along the Niger River in the Mopti region of Mali during September 2008. The major findings suggest: (1) water use behaviors and diarrheal disease management are influenced by the tremendous seasonal fluctuations in the riverine environment; (2) local awareness of the relationship between poor water quality, oral-fecal disease transmission, and waterborne disease is low; (3) interventions to mitigate the high incidence of childhood diarrhea and degraded water quality are limited by ongoing socio-economic, cultural, and environmental factors; and (4) women's level of health knowledge is socially and culturally dependent.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)449-457
    Number of pages9
    JournalHealth and Place
    Volume17
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 2011

    Keywords

    • Childhood diarrhea
    • Knowledge
    • Mali
    • Niger River Inland Delta
    • Water quality
    • Women

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