Workshift Changes in Hydration Status During Wildfire Suppression

Alejandro M. Rosales, Patrick S. Dodds, Joseph A. Sol, Alexander N. Marks, Joseph W. Domitrovich, Brent C. Ruby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Document wildland firefighters (WLFFs) hydration status during a singular workshift (13.7 ± 1.4 hours). Methods: WLFF researchers documented real-time WLFF (n = 71) urine metrics and fluid consumption. Body weight and blood samples (n = 25) were also collected. Two-tailed dependent t tests determined statistical significance (P < 0.05). Results: Body weight significantly decreased (-0.3 ± 1.1%, P > 0.05). Fluid consumption totaled 6.2 ± 2.3 L including food and 5.0 ± 2.1 L without food. Morning versus afternoon urine frequency (2.6 ± 1.3, 3.1 ± 1.9 voids), urine volume (1.2 ± 0.7, 1.3 ± 0.8 L), urine volume per void (440 ± 157, 397 ± 142 mL), and urine specific gravity (1.010 ± 0.007, 1.010 ± 0.007) were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Pre- to post-workshift serum chloride (103.2 ± 1.9, 101.4 ± 1.7 mM) and blood glucose (5.2 ± 0.4, 4.5 ± 0.7 mM) significantly decreased (P < 0.05), while serum sodium (141.5 ± 2.4, 140.8 ± 2.0 mM) and serum potassium (4.3 ± 0.3, 4.2 ± 0.3 mM) remained stable (P > 0.05). Conclusions: WLFFs can ingest fluid and food amounts that maintain workshift euhydration and electrolyte status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)963-969
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume63
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2021

Keywords

  • fluid intake
  • urinary indices
  • wildland firefighters

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Workshift Changes in Hydration Status During Wildfire Suppression'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this